dog shock collar

Post your thoughts and ideas on safety here.

Postby anna » 16 Jul 2008, 21:09

Many posters have already pointed out that this could be an extermely dangerous use of a shock collar. Not only is the neck close to the brain and heart but also the spinal cord. Damage to any of these can and most likely will result in very big complications like permanent total loss of mobility in the body or even death.

If you really have to play with these instruments then I would recommend that you use them below your waist. (This could still be lethal or cause severe complications. Please ask an expert before trying anything.) For example placing the collar around your thigh(s). The inside of your tighs is very, very sensitive. You will be surprised at the pain this can cause. :shock: Perhaps this is not possible depending on the exact modell of collar you use and what sort of triggering mechanism it has. In that case try finding an other type of collar that would only react to sounds.

(I am not in any way saying that you should try this. I am only trying to give you advice how to play more safely. I am not competent enough to be trusted in these matters. Always consult an expert before trying anything potentially dangerous.)
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Postby Dark_Lizerd » 17 Jul 2008, 01:12

If you are a tinkerer and must use the shock collar, consider this...
Modify the collar by removing the shock circuit and install jacks to the outside of the case. Now, what ever trigered the collar before, will now power the jack instead...
Modify what ever toy you want to plug into the collar's new jack...
That way, instead of making everyone here panic, you can keep the collar and have fun too...( even the shocker mounted elsewhere...)
And, if you now need more power, this should give you more room inside the case for more batteries...
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Postby Mc_ntk » 17 Jul 2008, 08:00

Calm down everyone.
Anna personal attacks are common on the internet and on the sneakernet.
Anna you buzwacker (off the book/show with the kid and huckle berry fin DARN why can't I remember the name?) :P

Anyways, the way the spikes go into your neck is the main safety concern I have for you.
There was a darwin award for a guy who used one of those electricity level detectors and he pricked it into his skin and it stopped his heart.

1999) A US Navy safety publication describes injuries incurred while doing don't's. One page described the fate of a sailor playing with a multimeter in an unauthorized manner. He was curious about the resistance level of the human body. He had a Simpson 260 multimeter, a small unit powered by a 9-volt battery. That may not seem powerful enough to be dangerous… but it can be deadly in the wrong hands.

The sailor took a probe in each hand to measure his bodily resistance from thumb to thumb. But the probes had sharp tips, and in his excitement he pressed his thumbs hard enough against the probes to break the skin. Once the salty conducting fluid known as blood was available, the current from the multimeter travelled right across the sailor's heart, disrupting the electrical regulation of his heartbeat. He died before he could record his Ohms.

How, you might ask, with only a 9V battery? Easy. One of the "rules of thumb" that the Navy teaches is the 1-10-100 rule of current. This rule states that 1mA of current through the human body can be felt, 10mA of current is sufficient to make muscles contract to the point where you cannot let go of a power source, and 100mA is sufficient to stop the heart. Let's look at Ohm's law. Ohm's law (for DC systems - I will not discuss AC here) is written as E=IR, where E is voltage in volts, I is current in Amps, and R is resistance in Ohms.

When we did the experiment in the electrical safety class to determine our body's resistance, we found a resistance of 500K Ohms. Using 9V and 500K Ohms in the equation, we come up with a current of 18 microAmps, below the "feel" threshold of 1mA. However, removing the insulation of skin from our curious sailor here, the resistance through the very good conducting electrolytes of the body is sharply lower. Around 100 ohms, in fact, resulting in a current of 90mA - sufficient to stop our sailor's heart and kill him.
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Postby ydal » 01 Dec 2009, 01:32

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Re: dog shock collar

Postby ello » 05 Jul 2010, 06:23

anna wrote:Many posters have already pointed out that this could be an extermely dangerous use of a shock collar. Not only is the neck close to the brain and heart but also the spinal cord. Damage to any of these can and most likely will result in very big complications like permanent total loss of mobility in the body or even death.


Like anna said someone can experience loss of mobilty... Be very careful if your on your back, if you black out while on your back, your tongue will most likely fall into the back of your mouth and prevent you from breathing, and you would suffocate.

My father was a retired EMT for a, power plant and someone nearly died there, because they were shocked and blacked out and fell onto their back. And if someone wasnt there, the man would have died.


If you do this in the future...PLEASE think about this and do something on your stomach or at least on your side
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Re:

Postby ruru67 » 05 Jul 2010, 20:48

Grinser wrote:It's probably one of those collars that go off if they "hear" a noise. They are used to train dogs not to bark. Depending on the sensitivity it could be a substitute for a gag, although I still prefer the look and the drooling that comes with a nice gag.

There's a squillion and one videos on YouTube of people playing with bark collars, and all of them really needed a loud, throaty roar before they went off. As a gag, it looked pretty ineffective. I suspect that a device sensitive enough to be set off by talking would also go off due to ambient noise. If you could ensure the microphone was right on the voice box, you might be able to get a better sensitivity setting (inverse square law and all that), but that's something you could never guarantee on a normal dog collar.

Heck, I'm sure just about every bark collar bought gets used on a human at some stage in its life, "just to see how it works", and I don't think I've ever heard of an injury or fatality from one. (At least, not from the electricity. It would surprise me if there weren't at least some bumps and bruises from the reactions!)
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby onestrangeguy » 06 Jul 2010, 03:28

I believe that those 'Bark' collars have some sort of audio processor that at least tries to distinguish a bark rather than just a loud noise. 8)
From the looks of the U-Tube videos you probably get a very quick, but intense jolt from them. you don't see many people trying them a second time. :wink:
There's a fine line between cuddling and holding someone down so they can't get away.
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby bound_jenny » 06 Jul 2010, 11:06

More "Stupid Human Tricks"... :roll:

Hooray for YouTube - the finest public forum for general stupidity... and its multiplication.

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Re:

Postby jorz » 26 Jan 2011, 10:21

kerryanne wrote:WELL SOUNDS BAD,BT CHECK OUT UTUBE LOADS OF POEPLE ARE USING THEM,YOU CAN SEE THEM HAVE A SHOCK AND THERE ARE OK.PLEASE CHECK IT OUT,
LOOK AT STUN GUNS AND SUCH LIKE,THEY NEVER KILL YOU AND THOSE THINGS KNOCK YOU OUT COLD


for me stun guns are dangerous weapon, and so with the gun.


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Re: dog shock collar

Postby illuminating » 04 Feb 2011, 18:50

Hi Kerryanne,

If you decide to heed all the warnings and are looking for an alternative, considder using voice activated curtains.
Make too much noice and you risk exposure.

You can even get units that use your phone to text all of your friends with an invitation to come and visit if you make a noice.
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Re:

Postby bRianex » 20 Aug 2011, 10:12

soleus wrote:Google "taser deaths" and you'll find it's not quite as clear-cut as that. Yes, there are usually other factors involved, but let's face it there are probably other factors involved in using one during a bondage session too ;-) Suppose the shock causes your neck muscles to spasm and you knock yourself unconscious against the floor?

Yes, I'm sure the "not above the waist" advice is just what they tell the layman and that suitably qualified experts know how to use electrodes safely in other places. However, I still wouldn't trust youtube in lieu of a suitably qualified expert...


I agree with this., Taser should only be used by experienced people only to avoid some harm to others. :rofl: :whip: :mrgreen: :roll:
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby river » 26 Aug 2012, 20:49

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and happy to be here. I'm a medical professional (critical care paramedic instructor) and I'm not commenting on the wisdom or foolishness of using the shock collar. I just have a couple of comments regarding the so-called taser deaths. Many deaths that were believed to have been caused by the taser directly, occurred in patients suffering from what's known as "excited delirium." The is a state of agitated psychosis, usually drug-induced, this used to be caused most often by PCP (think Rodney King) & cocaine overdoses, more recently there have been a pandemic of cases caused by "bath salts" (the most horrible drug since PCP in some versions, see: Miami face-eater). These patients run very high fevers, have very high heart rates and blood pressure, and are at extremely high risk of sudden cardiac arrest, especially when they are tased or physically restrained (especially hogtied or face-down.) What has been found is that a lot of these people were already on their way out and the taser was just the straw that broke the camel's back. We believe the cops have taken a lot of undue blame over the last 15 years for the outcomes in these cases. The only chance there was to save these people is to catch them, chemically paralyze & sedate them, which is extremely difficult to do and dangerous for everyone involved, trust me. All that being said, you may have a congenital heart defect or an aberrant electrical conduction pathway such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome which you may never know about until the body is stressed in such a way as to make it act up, such as vigorous exercise, pregnancy, medication, or... wait for it... electrical stimulation. At the minimum it would be wise to get a 12-lead EKG and have it read by a cardiologist to look for obvious abnormalities, although no test is 100% sensitive. Everyone needs to have a baseline EKG anyway if possible. (Keep a copy that you can give to EMS if you ever have to call them for a cardiac condition.) Just some food for thought. Thanks for having me. :hi:
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby bound_jenny » 26 Aug 2012, 23:43

Thank you, river, for giving us an informed, educated and sensible viewpoint on the use of such electrical shock devices.

Indeed, you can never know what lies under your skin, inside your body, until it is too late. One more reason to stick to electrical devices that are purposely made for human use, and to use them properly.

Jenny.
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby river » 27 Aug 2012, 00:02

I remembered one more thing. Someone said that current kills, not voltage. While in a sense that's completely true... however, the current we use for transcutaneous pacing, that means an electrical impulse transmitted through the skin, across the heart to induce or stop a beat is usually on the order of 50-120 mA... that's less than a fifth of one amp. Not even enough to light a small bulb. The heart can be very sensitive to just the right amount of current at the right time.

All that being said... if you go through with it, post results!

I have a coffee mug that said "never do anything you don't want to explain to the paramedics." I'm sure I'll probably eat those words one day. Our industry is full of stories of unfortunate and awkward mishaps. We used to have a guy that showed up every year on Christmas day with a Snapple or Gatorade bottle lodged in his rectum. I don't think it was accidental, I think it was his (not so) little joke on the world. The X-ray hung in the class room when I was a student. :rofl:
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Re: dog shock collar

Postby bound_jenny » 27 Aug 2012, 11:08

river wrote:"never do anything you don't want to explain to the paramedics


I like that. :D

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