timer plug modification

Post your thoughts and ideas on safety here.

timer plug modification

Postby Gregovic » 26 Mar 2016, 22:27

One of the release methods I use most often is based on a small 12v electromagnet. For timing I use those cheap ubiquitous timer plugs you can buy pretty much anywhere for a few bucks. One of the things that bugs me though is that they come standard with a little switch on the side. One I label the "kill me switch" because it locks the output of the timer permanently ON and is easy to miss or forget to chec, thus forcing you to use your backup (you DO have a backup, right?) So first thing I do is pull that little lever out. It does not affect the function of the timer in any way apart from making it impossible to lock it permanently on. Not sure if US timers are exactly the same and have this switch but I thought I'd share for those based in countries that use CEE7 type plugs
20160101_220526_zpsmepzixxr.jpg


Below is some shots of what this particular timer looks like on the inside and how it works. While they will all look a little different they pretty much all work on the same principle so.
First shot is simply the guts, with everything on top removed. The yellow bit on the right is the switch I'm talking about. It's actually in the engaged position here, keeping the thing turned on. To disable it, simply pull it out and toss it. It actuates the white lever that then presses the grey industrial switch at the bottom. The top left bit with the pink gear and copper windings is the actual timing bit. It's actually a single phase electrical motor that spins at your local AC frequency (60 rpm in the US, 50 rpm in europe). The gears then slow that rotation so that the central bit with the blue time adjusting thingies spins once in 24 hours. The bits in the middle is the euro style connector. US models will probably have similar timing and switching bits but a different connector layout
20160101_220625_zpscz211eyj.jpg


Second shot is just to show how the timing wheel engages with the switch. The blue bits are pressed down to switch the switch ON. When they move down they also move out. The wheel rotates until one of these blue bits moves underneath the white lever, which is pressed outwards. This then pressed on the gray powerswitch inside the device closing the circuit and powering whatever is connected.
20160101_221029_zpsjmxrah9b.jpg


Besides removing the switch pulling the timer apart also allows me to get a good look at the build quality and the components used. These particular timers are one of the cheapest I found in a while (I think they were about 4 euros a piece) but surprisingly they use high quality switches of a manufacturer that actually has spec sheets and ratings for their components which means these things have possibly actually undergone some sort of design testing.

I hope someone finds this info helpful.

Edited because I forgot to actually say how to disable the switch.
Edited again November 2017 because photobucket doesn´t allow linking anymore
Last edited by Gregovic on 11 Nov 2017, 22:58, edited 1 time in total.
My top theory: Everyone is an idiot. Maybe not always or regarding all topics. But sooner or later everyone is an idiot. Make sure you don't have to look back and think "Gee, how could I have been such an idiot?"
User avatar
Gregovic
***
 
Posts: 315
Joined: 26 Mar 2016, 20:31
Location: Netherlands

Re: timer plug modification

Postby Riddle » 28 Mar 2016, 23:15

Thank you for the information. The mechanical timers here in the US work like you described and can be modified the same way. It is good to know how to disable the always-on function.
My key ring glows in the dark. :wink:
User avatar
Riddle
***
 
Posts: 254
Joined: 24 Sep 2008, 06:37
Location: Oregon, USA

Re: timer plug modification

Postby Gregovic » 29 Mar 2016, 18:54

What I maybe should add is that this mod does leave you with a small hole in the side of the timer where the switch used to be. So if you have a habit of poking sharp pointy metal things into your timers you can simply superglue (any sort of glue that'll work on plastic should do) a bit of plastic (Piece of the clamshell packaging?) over the hole to prevent it. Personally I don't see the use as you do really have to deliberately stick something into it and then do your very very best to touch anything "live" in there.
My top theory: Everyone is an idiot. Maybe not always or regarding all topics. But sooner or later everyone is an idiot. Make sure you don't have to look back and think "Gee, how could I have been such an idiot?"
User avatar
Gregovic
***
 
Posts: 315
Joined: 26 Mar 2016, 20:31
Location: Netherlands

Re: timer plug modification

Postby cdinbonds » 29 Mar 2016, 20:40

You could just cut the latching part of the yellow "switch" off and the replace the button part in the case. Everything will look just as it did, but the "kill me switch" will not function without the inside lever. No need for glue. Probably just take a quick snip with diagonal cutters, or a small saw. Might have to file or sand a rough edge, but not really necessary if it fits back in smoothly.
There's a fine line between cuddling and holding someone down so they can't get away.
The beatings will continue until morale improves.
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons - for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
User avatar
cdinbonds
*****
 
Posts: 2053
Joined: 08 Apr 2006, 19:12
Location: South Central Washington

Re: timer plug modification

Postby Gregovic » 30 Mar 2016, 16:02

cdinbonds wrote:You could just cut the latching part of the yellow "switch" off and the replace the button part in the case. Everything will look just as it did, but the "kill me switch" will not function without the inside lever. No need for glue. Probably just take a quick snip with diagonal cutters, or a small saw. Might have to file or sand a rough edge, but not really necessary if it fits back in smoothly.


That's actually a good idea. Sometimes we miss the obvious solution staring us in the face :lol:
My top theory: Everyone is an idiot. Maybe not always or regarding all topics. But sooner or later everyone is an idiot. Make sure you don't have to look back and think "Gee, how could I have been such an idiot?"
User avatar
Gregovic
***
 
Posts: 315
Joined: 26 Mar 2016, 20:31
Location: Netherlands

Re: timer plug modification

Postby Sir Cumference » 31 Mar 2016, 01:12

I would just give the switch a dab of hot melt glue.
~ Leatherworking, blacksmithing , woodworking and programming are the most pervertable skills you can learn! ~
User avatar
Sir Cumference
Moderator
 
Posts: 1509
Joined: 29 Jan 2012, 21:00
Location: Scandinavia

Re: timer plug modification

Postby Gregovic » 31 Mar 2016, 13:02

Sir Cumference wrote:I would just give the switch a dab of hot melt glue.


I'm not a big fan of hot snot. It tends to come undone at the most inopportune times and doesn't really stick well to some plastics. The point of this mod is to be 100% confident that switch will NEVER keep the timer on.imho the only way to be sure of that is either remove the switch entirely or at least remove the bit that interfaces with the switching lever.
My top theory: Everyone is an idiot. Maybe not always or regarding all topics. But sooner or later everyone is an idiot. Make sure you don't have to look back and think "Gee, how could I have been such an idiot?"
User avatar
Gregovic
***
 
Posts: 315
Joined: 26 Mar 2016, 20:31
Location: Netherlands


Return to Selfbondage safety

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests